Monday, June 23, 2008

Aluminum Alloys, Brass Alloys

LM Series
Brass Alloys

Non ferreous Alloys

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Stainless Steels

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CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF STAINLESS STEELS

SS 304

Chemistry Data
Carbon

0.08 max

Chromium

18 - 20

Iron

Balance

Manganese

2 max

Nickel

8 - 10.5

Phosphorus

0.045 max

Silicon

1 max

Sulphur

0.03 max


Source: http://www.rksteels.com/SS304.htm

SS 316

Chemistry Data
Carbon

0.08 max

Chromium

16 - 18

Iron

Balance

Manganese

2 max

Molybdenum

2 - 3

Nickel

10 - 14

Phosphorus

0.045 max

Silicon

1 max

Sulphur

0.03 max


Source: http://www.rksteels.com/SS316.htm

Complete source for all SS compositions:
http://www.rksteels.com/technicaldata.htm

Alloys


Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon content between 0.02% and 1.7% by mass.
This article is about the material. For the specification language, see Alloy (specification language).
An alloy is a solid solution or homogeneous mixture of two or more elements, at least one of which is a metal, which itself has metallic properties. It usually has different properties from those of its component elements.
Alloying one metal with others often enhances its properties. For instance, steel is stronger than iron, its primary element. The physical properties, such as density, reactivity, Young's modulus, and electrical and thermal conductivity, of an alloy may not differ greatly from those of its elements, but engineering properties, such as tensile strength[1] and shear strength may be substantially different from those of the constituent materials. This is sometimes due to the sizes of the atoms in the alloy, since larger atoms exert a compressive force on neighboring atoms, and smaller atoms exert a tensile force on their neighbors, helping the alloy resist deformation. Alloys may exhibit marked differences in behavior even when small amounts of one element occur. For example, impurities in semi-conducting ferromagnetic alloys lead to different properties, as first predicted by White, Hogan, Suhl, Tian Abrie and Nakamura.[2][3] Some alloys are made by melting and mixing two or more metals. Brass is an alloy made from copper and zinc. Bronze, used for statues, ornaments and church bells, is an alloy of tin and copper.
Unlike pure metals, most alloys do not have a single melting point. Instead, they have a melting range in which the material is a mixture of solid and liquid phases. The temperature at which melting begins is called the solidus and the temperature when melting is complete is called the liquidus. However, for most alloys there is a particular proportion of constituents which give them a single melting point or (rarely) two. This is called the alloy's eutectic mixture.

Contents
1 Classification
2 Terminology
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
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Microstructure


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Metals & Alloys info

Find information about the chemistry of metals and alloys, including compositions, mechanical properties, reactions, chemical properties, uses, and mining.

Metal QuizTest your knowledge of the metals with this ten question quiz. Links about different metals are provided to help you find the answers.

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FAQs

Composition and Physical Properties of Alloys - Chart

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